Visual Stress

Migraines Caused by Visual Stress

There are many triggers for migraine such as visual stress, certain foods or hormonal factors.  About 40% of migraine attacks may be visually induced by flickering lights, patterns and glare. Examples include using a computer screen, supermarket lights and reading. Where the migraines have the visual-perceptual element, wearing a precision tint, specific to the individual, can have a dramatic effect on that person’s quality of life.

Helping Migraines and Headaches

Migraines  and Headaches Visual Stress

Individuals with reading problems and visual stress often experience headaches when reading and in these cases, precision tinted lenses would be expected to reduce the headaches.

Headaches and migraines are often associated with a sensitivity to glare, and most patients are sensitive to light during an attack. The glare sensitivity occurs in response to bright lights and bold geometric patterns.  This sensitivity is associated with an abnormally strong response in the visual cortex of the brain, both the brain abnormality and sensitivity are reduced by precision tinted lenses.

Headaches can have other causes, and persistent headaches in children should always be reported to the optometrist and to the GP in case any further investigation is required. They will assess the situation in full for your peace of mind.

Unfortunately, despite several years of lobbying to the government, overlay and colorimetry assessments are not yet covered by the NHS and so a charge will be associated with both.

Students in Higher education are entitled to substantial funding for precision tints under the Student Disability Service (DSA), so it’s worth looking at your options for financial help.

Coloured overlay and colorimetry assessments are carried out by Ruth Codling FBDO, a qualified Dispensing Optician and member of the International Institute of Colorimetry.

Book your assessment through our contact page or call Ruth directly on 01603 813499.

Visual Stress
Treatment for Visual Stress
Dyslexia